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Seattle University’s Just Sustainability: Hope for the Commons Conference, 2014 Saturday morning panel on Climate Displacement and Indigeneity: The State, “Governance-beyond-the-state”, and Prospects for Re-location

On August 9, 2014, Re-Locate curated and prompted a roundtable discussion at Seattle University’s Just Sustainability: Hope for the Commons Conference titled Climate Displacement and Indigeneity: The State, “Governance-beyond-the-state”, and Prospects for Re-location.

Roundtable Participants included:

Dr. Cynthia Moe-Lobeda (moderator), teaches theological ethics. She has lectured or consulted in Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, and many parts of North America in theology and matters of climate justice and environmental racism, economic globalization, moral agency, eco-feminist theology, and public church. She holds a doctoral degree in Christian Ethics from Union Theological Seminary, affiliated with Columbia University. Her most recent book is Resisting Structural Evil: Love as Ecological-Economic Vocation.

P. Joshua Griffin, doctoral candidate in sociocultural anthropology at the University of Washington, an episcopal priest, and co-curator of Re-Locate.

Jeff Hou, Associate Professor and Chair of the Landscape Architecture Department at the University of Washington, who’s practice focuses on community design, design activism, and cross-cultural learning around the world.

Micah Mcarty, special Assistant to the President for Tribal Government Relations at The Evergreen State College, former chairman of the Makah Indian Nation, and board chair of First Stewards, a coalition of indigenous communities working to advance adaptive climate change strategies.

Bob Mugerauer, professor of Architecture, Urban Design, and Planning, at the University of Washington, a phenomenologist who brings qualitative and participatory methods to bear on the complex, multi-scalar issues underlying environmental health and well-being in social urban ecologies.

Christina Roberts, associate professor of English and director of the Women and Gender Studies program at Seattle University; a woman of Gros Ventre (A’aninin) and Assiniboine ancestry, her work focuses on and the “poetics of displacement” and the importance of indigenous narratives especially for indigenous youth.

Kalani Young, Native Hawaiian transgender woman scholar-activist, an organizer with United Territories of Pacific Islanders Alliance, and a doctoral candidate in sociocultural anthropology at the University of Washington considering resistive home-making and indigenous survivance among houseless and home-free Kanaka Maoli (Native Hawaiian) communities in Waianae, Oahu.

After a framing of these questions, we asked the panelists:

Based on your experience, practice, and scholarship, how might emerging alter-global political formations capacitate and support demands for particular subjectivities, built environments, forms of cultural practice, and politics to endure and flourish in a “Common World”?

and

How might global collectives like Re-Locate join in the composition of these networks, with justice, without the replication and furthering of displacement?

Video of the prompt and discussion in development.

 

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